Every Word Matters

Doggish Naming Sense. The Amaranthine dog clans have a unique naming sense, which I sort of based on those quirky virtue names favored by early American colonists. Glint Starmark is the one who actually began the tradition by setting aside his wolvish birth name (Loor-ket), choosing meaningful names for his Kith children (like Path, Pace, and Trio), and giving his bondmate a doggish name (Radiance).

Their firstborn son Harmonious continued the tradition. His five sons are named Merit, Prospect, Valor, Eloquence, and Ever.

Other wolves who “married into” the dog clans follow the established custom by taking a new name. A good example would be Sentinel Skybellow (head of security at New Saga High School), who left the packs when he took Harmonious Starmark’s daughter Rampant as his bondmate.

Every Word Matters

I have fielded many questions from readers who didn’t meet me in fandom first. Did my best to answer:

Why did you label Book 1 “the first miko”?
Are all of the main characters in your series shrine priestesses? No. While this certainly hints at the legacy of Japanese culture that helped inspire my fandom storylines, miko refers to the main characters’ first names. Book One is about Tsumiko. In Book Two, I’ll introduce Kimiko. Book Three’s story belongs to a lady named Tamiko… and so on. [From a blog comment from 2018, in which I teasered future titles. ::twinkle::]

Lynne asked…
For those of us not familiar with Japanese culture, would you please explain “Miko” and the significance of the prefixes? Is it a two-part name, like Mary Sue, Mary Ann, Mary Margaret? Or something else? Thank you ~

::twinkle::

Every Word Matters

Stately House has changed quite a bit since the beginning of the Amaranthine Saga. That’s a trend I expect to continue. ::twinkle::

Stately House was refined and inspired, but it existed in such isolation. Like the emptiness clawing inside Argent, the building longed for a soul, for the liveliness and laughter of a loving family.

Tsumiko and the Enslaved Fox

006 stately

•   •   •

“Orphans?”

“We’ve been converting rooms.” Michael seemed confused by his confusion. “You didn’t know?”

Jacques simply repeated, “Orphans?”

“Tsumiko has opened Stately House to children of mixed heritage ….”

Michael went into detail while Jacques tried not to be devastated. Argent would accept children simply because they were part-chicken or part-goat, yet shun someone who wanted a place just as much. Non… more.

Lord Mettlebright’s Man

Every Word Matters

Clan Names. I was just mentioning portmanteaux on Patreon last week with regards to Amaranthine “surnames,” which are more properly referred to as clan names. I use a tried-and-true system often found in fantasy books. Mash a couple of words together, and … voila! That means it’s possible to pick apart most clan names and look at their meaning. Argent Mettlebright is an excellent place to start. ::twinkle::

005 mettle

Sentient Beasts

“Kith and Kin” is an old-timey phrase that refers to ones friends and family, and it led to the name I gave to the sentient animals who are part of the Amaranthine clans. In the Saga & Songs, the Amaranthine refer to themselves collectively as “the clans” or “the Kindred,” with an imperfectly understood hierarchy. There are the so-called High Amaranthine, who are able to take human form. Then the Kith, who seem to be (unusually large) Amaranthine versions of known animals. And then the Ephemera … but that’s another word for another blog post. ::twinkle::

004 kith

“Children are precious to the clans. They need our affection, our protection, our attention, our guidance.” Offering a small shrug, Deece added, “This is true for Kith and Kindred alike.”

—Tsumiko and the Enslaved Fox

•  •  •

Hey! Have you noticed yet that all Kith have four-letter names? That means that Kith-kin are often given a new name when they find their way into speaking form. What do you think Alder Woodacre’s birth name might have been? ::twinkle::

Fun Fact: Moon-kin Ambervelte, who is also Kith-kin, never changed his name. He still goes by Moon.

 

Reaver Classifications

Ward. The first reaver classification readers of the Amaranthine Saga encounter is ward, which is a bit of a catch-all category. Lots of subsets, depending on aptitudes and affinities. In a very general sense, wards are capable of crafting sigils.

003 ward

•  •  •

“Please, call me Michael. Ward is really more of a job description than a surname.”

“You’re a … ward?” That brought up unsettling images of wardens and prisoners. “I thought you were Aunt Eimi’s driver.”

“That’s certainly why I’m behind the wheel,” he said lightly.

Tsumiko and the Enslaved Fox

•  •  •

I’m regularly asked to provide a comprehensive glossary of reaver classifications, but … I’m still making them up. ::twinkle::

Every Word Matters

Word Nerd. I love words. I was thinking it would be fun to do a series of graphics that celebrate some of the key words (and names) in the Saga & Songs. Stuff like this will probably start cropping up here and on my other social media:

001 amaranthine

Naroo-soh

I think it would also be fun to do a series with the different varieties of Ephemera. And maybe even one for clan names. Time will tell. ::twinkle::